Thursday, April 7, 2011

Capriccio: Poetry or Music


Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
Renée Fleming is the Countess, and Joseph Kaiser the composer, in “Capriccio” at the Met.

That Strauss could produce an Opera as unusual and beautiful as Capriccio in Vienna in 1942 must indeed be an indication of his talent.

We are heading to the Metropolitan Opera for a Performance of Capriccio with Renée Fleming as the Countess tonight.

It was a simple enough plot: a widowed Countess must decide on poetry or music as represented by her suitors.

The music is so wonderful especially the last 20 minutes of the Countess’ meditation that concludes the opera. It must rank as one of the best you can hear anywhere.

Why do we need to choose: music, poetry or theatre! Why indeed!!!



I love Strauss, period! The final scene of Capriccio is one of his many sumptuous gifts to the soprano voice. It’s incredibly beautiful vocal writing, and it fits me very well. But there are other wonderful, passionate moments as well. Capriccio really makes me wish I had known Strauss, because I suspect he had a rich inner life. There’s a lot of subtlety in this piece.

Conductor: Andrew Davis 


By the way, it is great fun getting the tickets. They have Rush Tickets for seniors; all 50 of $115 tickets for $20 thanks to a gift from Agnes Varis and her husband, Karl Leichtmanv.

You have to be quick with the computer as tickets sold out in the first minute.

So in my own little way you can read my book for free:
NHS: The Way We Were! Free!
FREE eBook: Just drop me a line with your email.

Email: cockroachcatcher (at) gmail (dot) com.


3 comments:

Jobbing Doctor said...

Try as I may, I haven't really warmed to late Strauss operas.

I have seen Salome and Ariadne auf Naxos, and am afraid that they did little for me.

Following your advice I might try to get into Capriccio.

I'll let you know.

HyperCRYPTICal said...

No need to choose at all CC! We can enjoy them all!

Anna :o]

Cockroach Catcher said...

J.D. Thanks.

Unfortunately, for many operas you have to wait so long for the good bits. I have put this in the main post:

"Renée Fleming
I love Strauss, period! The final scene of Capriccio is one of his many sumptuous gifts to the soprano voice. It’s incredibly beautiful vocal writing, and it fits me very well. But there are other wonderful, passionate moments as well. Capriccio really makes me wish I had known Strauss, because I suspect he had a rich inner life. There’s a lot of subtlety in this piece."

Capriccio opens in a peculiar chamber music fashion and it is indicative of the talent of Strauss. The last great Met performance was by Kiri.

Anna: of course not and it is silly to do things like who is the best composer and best poet.